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Comments Off on Philadelphia Inquirer Home & Design Section March 2006

Friday March 17, 2006

HOST Chestnut Hill interior shot

Host, in Chestnut Hill, is the brainchild of a former art director and graphic designer, Doug Reinke.
‘Transitional modern’

As an art director and graphic designer, Doug Reinke spent years designing for clients—including producing catalogs for home stores—until one day he realized he was more interested in furniture than advertising. Last month, Reinke did something about that when he opened Host in Chestnut Hill.
He describes the look of his stylishly appointed home-furnishings shop as “urban” and “transitional.”
Says Reinke, “It’s a bit contemporary for Chestnut Hill, but transitional modern.”
Among the wares featured at Host: Convivo Italian ceramic and pewter tableware ($65 for a dinner plate); seagrass and jute area rugs, with lots of custom options, from Merida Meridian ($550 for a 9-by-12 in seagrass); a beautiful bright-white ceramic line ($16.99 for a large square platter; $8.99 for a long, skinny olive tray); and vintage-looking garden pottery from Guy Wolff ($49 for a tall pot).
Besides lamps, pillows, mirrors and wall art, Host also offers a well.edited furniture selection. There’s a line of sleek metal and glass accent tables (a round side table with three shelves is $275; a wheeled bar cart is $299), as well as a collection of pieces in dark birch, including a buffet and hutch with three sliding glass doors ($899) and a coordinating trestle dining table that seats 10 with the addition of two cleverly designed end leaves ($799).
The centerpieces of the store are undoubtedly the upholstered, leather and slipcovered line of chairs and sofas (starting at $879). Sturdily made by Lee Industries. The line has 500 fabric and leather choices, a wide range of leg- and arm-style options, and a choice of foam, spring or down cushioning.
For those struggling with furniture decisions, Reinke, who suggests that customers bring in room photos, swatches and paint chips, offers plenty of design advice.

– Eils Lotozo